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IRTC 2023


Conference Program

February 15-17, 2023

Lilliad, Lille, France

Logo irtc 2023

IRTC23 will be all about dialogue on raw materials for a sustainable future. Raw materials play an important role in economic and technological development of, among others, the renewable & digital transition. At the same time, supply of many raw materials heavily depends on precarious and unsustainable supply chains. This conference brings together international leading experts, practitioners and participants, to exchange perspectives and engage in in-depth discussions on how to assess and manage raw materials and criticality, and to explore the potential of different strategies to secure supply. Therefore, IRTC23 welcomes a diverse audience from industry, academics and policy-making concerned with raw materials for a sustainable future. 

Keynote Conversations

In a series of keynote conversations, international criticality experts will share their perspectives on critical raw materials for a sustainable future in moderated in-depth discussions.

Talks by Practitioners and Researchers

Practitioners and researchers in the field of critical raw materials are invited to contribute to the shape and content of the conference by sharing their work or case on critical raw materials in relation to thematic sessions as presented in the program below. The sessions will be chaired by multidisciplinary teams of experts to facilitate a discussion with the presenters.

Session Chairs will select the most novel contributions for publication in a special issue of the journal Mineral Economics.

Are you as practitioner or researcher in the field, interested to share your work on critical raw materials? Please submit an abstract proposal for a 15-min presentation or a poster for the main hall exhibition! The abstract submission closes on October 19, 2022.

Participants

Participants are invited to join the two-and-a-half-day conference to meet colleagues, keynote speakers and conference Chairs, to engage in discussions in the sessions and to join the networking activities. On-site participation will be limited to around 180 people to encourage meaningful discussions and networking. Online participation in the sessions will be possible.

The early bird registration is now open! If early bird tickets are sold out and/or after December 15, the regular fee applies.

August 31, 2022: Opening of abstract registration system

October 11, 2022: Opening of conference registration

October 24, 2022: Abstract submission deadline

November 30, 2022: Information on review results

December 2, 2022: Full programme available

December 15, 2002: End of early-bird registration

Wednesday, February 15 – Workshops

10:00

Welcome Coffee

10:30

A. Resource and criticality challenges in diverse lead industrial sectors

Part I: Rare Earths

Organisers: Nabeel Mancheri (REIA), Naeem Adibi (WeLOOP)

B. IRTC-Training workshop

Part I: IRTC pilot training: Understand raw material risks in the supply chain

Organisers: IRTC Education Expert Committee

C. UNECE workshop

Part I

Organisers: Harikrishnan Tulsidas, Charlotte Griffiths, Slavko Solar (UNECE)

12:00

Conference registration and lunch buffet

Pre-workshop refreshment

13:30

A. Resource and criticality challenges in diverse lead industrial sectors

Part II: Battery and data centre equipment (with CEDaCI project)

C. UNECE
workshop

Part II

15:30

Coffee break

16:00

Open plenary discussion with the Conference Chairs

Current geopolitical events and Critical Raw Materials:
What to expect from the future, and how can we still collaborate?

Darina Blagoeva (JRC, Europe), Gian Andrea Blengini (Politecnico di Torino, Italy), Magnus Ericsson (RMG Consulting, Sweden), Christoph Helbig (University of Bayreuth, Germany), Paul Lusty (BGS, United Kingdom), Anthony Ku (consultant, USA), Luisa Moreno (Tahuti Global, Canada/Uganda) David Peck (TU Delft, Netherlands), Guido Sonnemann (University of Bordeaux, France), Akanksha Tyagi (CEEW, India), Patrick Wäger (Empa, Switzerland), Peng Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

Free access for everyone via live-stream

17:30

Conference registration and welcome reception

Check-in, meet & greet

18:30

Apero-dinner

Dinner, drinks & networking

Thursday, February 16

08:00

Conference registration

08:45

Opening speech by Bernd Schäfer (EIT RawMaterials)

09:00

Introductory remarks by Constanze Veeh/Milan Grohol (DG GROW)

09:15

Keynote conversation: Criticality

Roderick Eggert (Colorado School of Mines), Peter Buchholz (DERA) and Kotaro Shimizu (Mitsubishi UFJ); moderated by Luis Tercero (Fraunhofer ISI)

10:00

Session 1 – Criticality: Stakeholder perspectives

Chaired by Luisa Moreno (Tahuti Global), Magnus Ericsson (RMG Consulting) and Roland Gauss (EIT RawMaterials)

Session 2 – Criticality methods

Chaired by Gian Andrea Blengini (Politecnico di Torino), Christoph Helbig (University of Bayreuth) and Philip Nuss (German Federal Environment Agency)

10:00

Paradoxes in material criticality: revealing the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon

Yulia Lapko (Politecnico di Milano), David Peck (TU Delft)

A novel aproach to criticality measurement via an Integrated Sustainability Assessment Tool (ISAT)

Francesco Di Carolo Rocco Lagioia (ITRB, Belgium)

10:15

Carbon neutral energy transition: “From Emissions to Resources”

Jan Mertens (ENGIE, Ghent University), Fanny Maigne, Olivier Sala, Peter Vervee, Luc Goossens, Elodie Lecadre (ENGIE)

New method and indicators to study mineral criticality from a French Administration’s perspective

Antoine Boubalt (BRGM)

10:30

Niobium as a critical raw material for the world and strategic for Brazil

Carlos Peiter, Tiago Braga (Centre for Mineral Technolocy, Brazil) Gian Andrea Blegnini (Politecnico di Torino)

The IRTC web-tool to support companies in monitoring and mitigating raw material value chain risks

Dieuwertje Schrijvers, Alison Vandromme, Sana Almansour, Luigi Poggi (WeLOOP), Alessa Hool (ESM Foundation)

10:45

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

11:00

Coffee break

11:30

Ukraine, Russia, Belarus and global mineral supply

Magnus Ericson, Olof Löf (RMG Consulting)

Incorporating conflict risk of minerals and metals supply into life cycle assessment

Anish Koyamparambath (University of Bordeaux), Steven Young (University of Waterloo), Guido Sonnemann (University of Bordeaux)

11:45

Geography of control? A deep dive assessment on criticality and critical materials supply chains ­

Alberto Prina Cerai (independent analyst)

The Risks of “Recycling” Recycling Indicators: A Case Study of Tin

Jessie Bradley, Benjamin Sprecher (TU Delft), Rene Kleijn (Leiden University), Willem Auping (TU Delft)

12:00

Reducing demand for raw materials with car sharing & other (shared) mobility solutions and policies

Dani Sprecher (MyWheels)

Metal criticality assessment of sodium ion batteries

Shan Zhang, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

12:15

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

12:30

Lunch + poster session

Standing lunch, networking & poster exhibition

14:00

Keynote conversation: Supplying critical raw materials

Karen Hanghøj  (BGS), Gavin Mudd (RMIT) and Anders Sand (Boliden); moderated by Dieuwertje Schrijvers (WeLOOP)

14:45

Session 3 – Sourcing and trade

Chaired by Paul Lusty (BGS), Nedal Nassar (USGS) and Carlos Peiter (Centre for Mineral Technology, Brazil)

Session 4 – ESG and regulation

Chaired by Carolin Friedrich (Stakeholder Reporting), Louis Maréchal (OECD) and René Kleijn (Leiden University)

14:45

Examining three decades of global dysprosium supply chain through a material flow analysis

Disna Eheliyagoda (Aarhus University & Grundfos), Badrinath Veluri (Grundfos), Devarajan Ramanujan (Aaarhus University), Gang Liu (University of Southern Denmark)

Global mineral resources for sustainable development

Paul Ekins (University College London, UNEP Resource Panel), Patrice Christmann (Krysmines)

15:00

Nickel supply: primary metallurgical processing capacity does not satisfy changing demand

Steven Young, Jamie Tauber (University of Waterloo)

Elements and Social Risk Assessment

Tatiana Vakhitova (ANSYS)

15:15

Magnesium supply shortage

Martin Tauber (International Magnesium Association)

Applicability of Country Governance Indicators for Assessing Environmental and Social Criticality

Konstantin Kühnel (BGR), Matthias Finkbeiner (TU Berlin), Gudrun Franken (BGR), Vanessa Bach (TU Berlin), Philipp Schuette (BGR)

15:30

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

15:45

Coffee break

16:15

16:15

Natural and synthetic graphite: Trade-offs between carbon footprint and supply risk

Aina Mas Fons, Anish Koyamparambath, Guido Sonnemann, Philippe Loubet (University of Bordeaux)

Responsible sourcing of critical minerals; the role of ESG

Aleksandra Cavoski, Robert Lee, J. Ahuja (University of Birmingham)

16:30

Tracking the flows of rare earth elements (REEs) in permanent magnets for electric vehicles and wind turbines in the UK to inform circular economy decisions ­

Wan-Ting Hsu, Evi Petavratzi, Eimear Deady, Markus Zils (BGS), Narendra Singh (University of Exeter)

Rethinking State Sovereignty over the Raw Materials in the era of planetary boundaries

Chamu Kuppuswamy (University of Herfordshire), Daria Boklan (National Research University Moscow)

16:45

Developing bottom-up understanding of primary copper supply under the shared socio-economic pathways

Stephen Northey, Damien Giurco (University of Technology Sydney), Mohan Yellishetty (Monash University, Stefan Pauliuk (Freiburg University)

Life Cycle Impact Assessment of Lithium mineral concentrates production for FEB applications

Maria Cristina dos Santos Ribeiro, António Fiúza (University of Porto)

17:15

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

17:15

Poster session

18:30

Dinner

Common conference dinner

Friday, February 17

08:00

Conference registration

09:00

Opening of day 2 by Constanze Veeh/Milan Grohol, DG GROW

09:15

Keynote conversation: Changing demand and how to address it

Tom Graedel (Yale University), Toru Muta (IEA) and tbc; moderated by Alessa Hool (ESM Foundation)

10:00

Session 5 – Changing demand

Chaired by Akanksha Tyagi (CEEW India), Patrick Wäger (Empa) and Darina Blagoeva (JRC)

Session 6 – Design for circularity

Chaired by Tatiana Vakhitova (ANSYS), Komal Habib (University of Waterloo) and David Peck (TU Delft)

10:00

Critical materials demand for electrolysers and supply chain dependencies for the EU

Darina Blagoeva (JRC)

Design and Circularity of Data Centre Equipment

Deborah Andrews, Kristina Kerwin (London South Bank University)

10:15

Exploring different electric vehicle and battery scenarios on critical raw material demand in the UK

Sophie Kempston (University of Warwick)

Circular economy systems for lithium-ion batteries

Nina Meyer (University of St. Gallen)

10:30

Substitution and Reduction of Critical Raw Materials in Magnetic Memory and Storage

Atsufumi Hirohata (University of York)

The Challenges for Recycling of Rare Earth Magnets

Allan Walton (University of Birmingham), Nick Mann (Hypromag Ltd.)

10:45

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

11:00

Coffee break

11:30

Insights from three historical critical metal cases: Learning for the future

Sampriti Mahanty (NICER, University of Manchester), Gavin Harper (NICER, University of Birmingham, University of Maastricht)

Addressing criticality in rare earths through the decarbonization in permanent magnets recycling

Denis Prodius, Ikenna C. Nlebedim (Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory)

11:45

Material scarcity and the energy transition: an integrated LCA – IAM perspective

Christian Bauer, Romain Sacchi, Alvaro Hahn (Paul Scherrer Institute)

Circular PV Modules

Perine Fleury, Tim Kaasjager (Biosphere Solar)

12:00

A low carbon hydrogen economy in the UK: decarbonisation drives long-term PGM demand growth

Francesca Price (BGS)

Circularity index for product design: a case study of car-based mobility

Gabriel Carmona (University of Cambridge), Kai Whiting (University of Leuven), Jonathan Cullen (University of Cambridge)

12:15

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

12:30

Lunch & poster prize

Standing lunch, networking & announcement of poster award

14:00

Keynote conversation: Addressing criticality in policy and industry

Anthony Ku (consultant), Patrick D’Hugues (BRGM) and Min-Ha Lee (KITECH); moderated by Nabeel Mancheri (REIA)

14:45

Session 7 – Industry case studies

Chaired by Atsufumi Hirohata (University of York), Naeem Abidi (WeLOOP) and Orlando Rios (University of Tennessee)

Session 8 – Policy case studies

Chaired by Peng Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Evi Petavratzi (BGS) and Guido Sonnemann (University of Bordeaux)

14:45

Repurposing and recycling of lithium-ion batteries: Identifying favorable use cases.

Surinder Singh, Ratnesh Sharma (Relyion Energy Inc), Anthony Ku (Foresight Transitions Ltd)

Criticality assessment, circularity, EU open strategic autonomy and Sustainable Product Initiative: how to join the dots?

Umberto Eynard, Thibaut Maury-Micolier, Fabrice Mathieux, Fulvio Ardente (JRC)

15:00

Critical Minerals Strategy and the Circular Economy for Technology Metals

Frances Wall, Carol Pettit (University of Exeter)

How worldwide coordinated research funding answers raw materials challenges: a case study

Dina Carrilho (FCT Portugal)

15:15

Critical Minerals Strategy and the Circular Economy for Technology Metals

Sophie Rivoirard, Erick Petit (MagREEsource)

OFREMI, the French Observatory on mineral resources for Industrial sector, a public/private partnership

Stéphane Bourg, Christophe Poinssot, Patrick D’Hugues (OFREMI)

15:30

Discussion with speakers and the audience, led by the Session Chairs

15:45

Coffee break

16:15

Summary of the sessions

16:45

Closing

17:00

Farewell Apéritif

Drinks & goodbyes

Session 1 – Criticality: stakeholder perspectives

Criticality means something different to a local government than to a multinational company, to a company that controls raw material sources than to a company that relies on supply by others, to a nation endowed with large and varied geological deposits than to one without such an endowment. This session explores different perspectives on criticality that arise from the position of the focal actors.

Session 2 – Criticality methods

This session features existing and emerging methods for criticality determination. It explores the usefulness of indicators and the applicability of methodologies to different contexts.

Session 3 – Sourcing and trade

This sessions explores the distribution of primary and secondary supply, its concentration and issues arising from concentrated supply. Furthermore, trade, trade restrictions and geopolitical issues are tied to global raw material sourcing and key considerations in this session.

Session 4 – ESG and regulation

There is an obligation and increased societal and political pressure to better address environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues along value chains. Negative ESG impacts across materials’ value chains can make them more critical – by increasing supply risks, or as a separate dimension of concern. This session explores ESG issues related to critical raw materials, including but not limited to reputational risks for companies, risk mitigation measures, regulatory measures, and the state and effectiveness of transparency initiatives.

Session 6 – Design for circularity

Product designers play a key role in determining the current use of raw materials, the longevity of products and the future availability of secondary raw materials. This session highlights current challenges in design as they pertain to the reduced use or substitution of critical raw materials, conflicts between different design dimensions, and best practice examples for reconciling product function and reduced criticality at all scales (company to global) through design for recycling, reuse, remanufacturing, repair, and reduction.

Session 7 – Addressing criticality: Industry case studies

This session features case studies from industries dealing with criticality: by risk screening, substitution efforts, fostering recycling, increasing transparency, transitioning to business models to improve resource sustainment, and/or other mitigation measures to reduce risks throughout the supply chain.

Session 8 – Addressing criticality: Policy case studies

Policy plays a decisive role in incentivizing and supporting supply risk screening and management. How can they help to effectively mitigate risks for vulnerable industries? In this session, we expect international examples and experiences with policies that aim at favorable framework conditions for risk mitigation and resource conservation. 

Session 5 – Changing demand

Technological change is a key driver for changing raw material demand, with megatrends such as electric mobility, digitalization and the energy transition expected to drive demand for critical raw materials in the coming decades. This session focuses on scenarios and the (possible) measures by companies and governments to meet this challenge in a responsible and timely manner, as well as competition for the available raw materials, not only between countries or companies in the emerging uses, but also between these and the current users of the critical raw materials.

IRTC-Training workshop – Part II: Open stakeholder consultation workshop

15 February, 13:30 – 15:30

This workshop brings together stakeholders from different areas to discuss the educational concept of the project IRTC-Training. IRTC-Training develops trainings for company professionals and other interested parties in raw materials risk management through i) providing the required knowledge to comprehend the theory and application of criticality concepts, and ii) equipping them with the competencies to select appropriate criticality mitigation strategies for the raw materials used in their organisation, and adapt those to the organisation’s needs.

In this interactive workshop, we will present the progress of the training development together with the expert group that is guiding the accompanying ISO certification. Participants will be asked to provide their feedback on envisaged contents and structure of the trainings and give input on the competencies they wish in future raw material risk managers. Through this workshop, we want to actively involve different perspectives and expectations in the training development process.

We encourage stakeholders from industry, NGOs, universities, policy-making, and civil society to participate and have an active voice in the education of future raw material risk managers.

Participation is free of charge. The number of participants is limited; priority will be given to a balanced mixture of stakeholder groups.

UNECE Workshop: The role of UNFC and UNRMS in enabling the sustainable management of raw materials

15 February, 14:00 – 15:30 and 16:00 – 17:30

A more sustainable paradigm in resource management is required to address the population growth, urbanisation and looming crises fuelled by climate change. For example, over 40 critical raw materials are necessary for the future economy to enable energy, mobility and digital transitions. The demand for these materials by 2030 will increase by a factor of ten or more, and the overall trade in minerals will surpass that of oil and gas by 2050. The United Nations Framework Classification for Resources (UNFC) and the United Nations Resource Management System (UNRMS) support governments, industries, financial institutions, and civil society to collaborate and enable an innovative framework for managing raw materials for a sustainable future by focusing on the social, environmental and economic viability and nurturing of the natural capital. The workshop will discuss the opportunities and challenges in sustainable raw material management, future trends, best practices and case studies on the application of UNFC and UNRMS.       

Participation is free of charge. The number of participants is limited; priority will be given to a balanced mixture of stakeholder groups.

Resource and criticality challenges in diverse lead industrial sectors – Part I: Assessing the permanent magnet motor sustainability with an integrated tool

15 February, 10:30 – 12:00

Rare earths are widely considered as critical metals, which various green technologies heavily depend on. How to assess the sustainability of rare earth-based products or how can the industry trace the materials from mine to product is a challenge. At present, there is no single environmental footprint representing the rare earth sector. Thus, when the industry and its consumers wish to market themselves as environmentally friendly, they face a confusing range of choices and methods for environmental evaluation. In the workshop, the Rare Earth Industry Association (REIA) along with its partners Minviro, Circularise, Grundfos and BEC Magnetics will demonstrate its state-of-the-art method as a common way of measuring environmental performance of rare earths with a blockchain based traceability tool.

During the workshop, first of its kind in nature, REIA and its project partners will provide a hands-on training on the tool we developed to overcome the sustainability and traceability challenges including practical sessions on developing a metrics for sustainable mining, sourcing and the establishment of the global sustainability standard for REEs.

The key outcome of the training session would be you get familiar with:

  • An assessment system to enable the calculation of REE supply chain data with integrated measuring and improving socio‐environmental impact
  • A blockchain digital ledger with inbuilt data security via cryptography, featuring the ability to identify supply‐chain vulnerabilities and opportunities.

Please join us for a training workshop featuring leading researchers and practitioners  from around the world sharing their insights into these increasingly significant issues for modeling REEs in Life Cycle Assessment and a blockchain tool for material traceability

Resource and criticality challenges in diverse lead industrial sectors – Part II: Battery and data centre equipment (with CEDaCI project)

15 February, 13:30 – 15:30

The E-mobility and rechargeable battery market are significantly growing, and it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 20.5% during the forecast period 2022-2027. In this context, the Haut-de-France (HdF) region is expected to become a significant actor in the battery sector by installing three new gigafactories of batteries. The HdF region has several strengths (e.g., strategic localization, solid automotive industry, strong R&D actors, and battery gigafactories) and weaknesses (e.g., lack of recycling plants). Herein lies the relevance of managing sustainable regional development and the need to support the regional actors of the battery sector in implementing circular economy strategies. This session aims to present market analysis, today and considering technological development, and circularity linked to a robust regional strategy for the circular battery industry.  

The Data Centre Industry (DCI) has grown rapidly and generates a large volume of eWaste/ WEEE. The current infrastructure for dealing with this waste is underdeveloped; consequently, there is a real and urgent need to address this now. The project CEDaCI will build a Circular Economy for the Data Centre Industry by bringing together stakeholders from all equipment life cycle stages to turn this waste into a useful resource and support the ongoing rapid growth of the DCI. In this session, we aim to demonstrate the Circular Data Centre Compass (CDCC) developed in the frame of the CEDaCI project. CDCC is a unique, free online resource designed to guide the Data Centre Industry (DCI) in choosing more circular options during the procurement, refurbishment, and disposal of servers by assessing the environmental, social, economic and criticality of raw materials.